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Your first month at university

University will last longer than an Open Day or Freshers week, and even if you have read all of the reviews online, or Google’s map your campus, your first month at university will be full of ups and downs.

The hardest part of university is that you will have a lot to get used to and adjust yourself to your new routine. Freshers Week and induction lectures will be exciting and new and this will keep you entertained for the first few days, however, once the dust of drinking games has settled you might find yourself in a scary place – feeling homesick. Feeling homesick is completely normal during a big life change like moving away from home or starting a new chapter in your life. One of the best ways to keep yourself from dissolving is to ensure you are busy all the time by doing these that you love. If you enjoy reading, partying, socialising or exploring; do all of these new things, just because you have moved to somewhere new it doesn’t mean you have to change your hobbies and interests.

After the induction lessons, your lectures will differ in difficulty. There may be some courses that you find really easy, but others may go straight over your head. In a few cases, it could be that you don’t respond well to your lecturer’s teaching style, haven’t done the required reading or even some teachers choose to get the hard stuff – like theories – out of the way at first. If you are having trouble at the beginning of your lessons or even the entire course, you can speak to your personal tutor or course administrator. The good news is that universities understand that sometimes your decisions won’t always be the right thing for you, and you should have a certain amount of time to be able to change courses or try something else.

A great thing about starting a degree is that you’re going to meet so many people – think about all of those followers on Twitter! There will be literally hundreds of new classmates, students and dorm mates to meet and the majority of them won’t cause a stir. Everybody that is going to university is slightly more mature than college and school students and with the thousands of students that attend the campus each day, you’re bound to meet a handful of people to hit it off with.

One of the hardest things that students find difficult to deal with, is the extra responsibility given to them hand-in-hand with their degree. A lot of undergraduates don’t expect all of this responsibility and how so much is expected of them now! The truth is, you are an adult now, on your own and over the age of 18 – there are things that you need to do for yourself. Your parents won’t be able to wash your clothes anymore, cook your meals and pay your bills. It is up to you now. It’s important that you understand what to expect when living in halls. There is a finance department at university, so you can speak to an advisor if you are having trouble adjusting to all of the direct debits and bills coming out of your account, and can’t catch up with your incoming and outgoings.

Even with the excitement of reinventing yourself at university, there will be so many opportunities for you to discover who you are as a person, as well as trying out new things. The best thing to keep in mind is that you should continue to stay true to who you are as a person and never feel pressured to change that to make a few temporary friends. University is full of a range of personalities from different backgrounds and cultures and you’ll find your friendship group in no time at all. And if you don’t like your first month at university, well, the next one will be completely different, so trek on with your head held high. Be sure to check out any useful guides for surviving university, online. Whether these be for how to make friends at university or just the top tips for your first year at university.