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Imperial College London, Medicine Personal Statement

Medicine, Imperial College London

My initial interest in medicine stemmed from my excitement of Human Biology. Each time I reflect upon the sheer complexity and seemingly impossible intricacy of the human body, I feel awestruck. It seems incomprehensible that during each cell division, a 30-book set of Encyclopaedia Brittanica’s worth of information is copied. What’s equally fascinating is how doctors are able to fix the complexities of the human body. This is why being part of this profession is my ambition. Furthermore, with the future ever advancing the quality of treatment, success within medicine should be even more common and rewarding. An example of this was during my time shadowing a consultant Haematologist, who revealed that he is now able to successfully treat more patients than ever before. Whilst I am aware that the profession sometimes has drawbacks, such as mortality, which is something I have encountered during my experience, I believe I have the resilience to deal with both of these.

Spending work experience at my local hospital, I was fortunate enough to see many different departments, and it was mesmerising to witness the true depth of knowledge within medicine. Shadowing a consultant of Chemical Pathology, an already highly specialised sub- department,  made me realise that the journey of a doctor was a life long process of self improvement. Being able to specialise in the future, and make a field of medicine my own is an exciting prospect, and even though I may be taking exams until my mid thirties, very few professions can be as consistently stimulating as medicine.

A further highlight of my work experience was witnessing a neurosurgical procedure as I learnt so much, so quickly. The atmosphere was so deceptively relaxed, yet focused, and considering the complexity of the operation, the surgeons were so assured, so calm. It felt that each member of the room was as important as each other, from the nurses to the surgeons. Witnessing the team in action made me realise how medicine is not purely a solo effort, and how important teamwork skills are. What was even more astounding was the complex technology used, with the future advancing technology even further. Being able to embrace this in the future is something I greatly look forward to.

From October this year I will be volunteering at a children’s Hospice, on a weekly basis through the winter. My visits there earlier were positively perplexing as the atmosphere was so positive and full of hope despite the circumstances. I initially wanted to volunteer due to my grandmother, who became disabled. The gratitude I received through aiding her daily outweighed the sometimes unpleasant chores and I felt humbled.

Last year I also entered two medical essay competitions, which I really enjoyed researching about due to the very open titles. One of the essays was ethically centred, and one was more academically stretching. Being able to explore and research a topic of personal interest is something I would relish at university. But aside from academics, I have a profound passion for cricket. Despite my hectic schedule, I have been able to manage my time effectively and fit cricket around my exams. Through cricket I have been able to meet a multitude of people from different backgrounds, as well as having experienced leadership through captaincy, whereby I have had to make hard decisions under pressure, raise team morale and lead from the front. I also developed teamwork skills throughout my time playing schoolboy sports such as football.

I feel that no other job is able to provide the perfect harmony between satisfaction and hard work as well as medicine, and more pressingly, I know that I have the ability to make a really positive, lasting impression in this world of medicine due to the combination of my fascination, ambition, drive and empathy.