University of Bristol, Law Personal Statement

Law, University of Bristol

Law is the predominant overarching factor in defining the stability of our society. My fervent interest in Law developed when I discovered that I thrive on analysing problems and questioning to what extent Law can confront these issues. My interest in the application of Law and its integral role in governing society led me to start my Law blog, thelinksoflaw.tumblr.com. In my EPQ, I proposed the question “Can money buy justice in American legal systems?” to which I argued that justice cannot ultimately be bought, relishing the challenge of constructing an outwardly indefensible argument. Reading Reasonable Doubts by Dershowitz sparked my interest in analysing how race, financial background and social climate influence case outcomes. Having grown up in both England and Germany, I have noticed that in Germany, citizens are more bound by the literal and precise terms of Law, even to the extent of crossing the road, whereas in England, interpretations of Law are more flexible. I have learnt that Law is malleable and dynamic, as it continues to evolve throughout history.

Reading Friedman’s A History of American Law interested me as to the flexibility of imported statutes into a federal system. Reading Morestein’s Know your consumer Law and Twining and Miers How to do things with rules encouraged me to consider the disparity between the way in which law is written, and the way in which Law is interpreted. The Times Everyday Law and Law’s Strangest Cases has helped me to appreciate how Law pervades every aspect of daily life, and the vital importance of distinguishing between Law, morality and emotion when reaching a conclusion. Reading Raymond Wacks’ A Very Short Introduction to Law and A Philosophy of Law interested me as to the nature of jurisprudence. Tom Bingham’s The Rule of Law enlightened me as to the global disparity of the rule of law.

As a Sixth Form Academic Scholar, the analytical approach required to study history appeals to me due to the surgical attention to detail it requires. Drawing links between seemingly disparate periods has particularly interested me, after linking The Holocaust with US Westward Expansion and Tudor Irish Rebellions. German has broadened my understanding of approaching a subject with rigorous discipline and applying existing knowledge to a new situation. In English Literature, studying Danby’s thesis of the definition of ‘nature’ in King Lear provoked me to delve deeper into natural law, comparing the notion with Sharia Law. Geography has taught me that similarities in law is what unites countries together, but differences in law can drive transnational communities apart.

Outside of the curriculum, I am an avid debater and was awarded the prize for best individual speaker at Taylor Trophy finals. As MUN Secretary, I have found taking diagnostic approaches to determine pragmatic solutions when drafting resolutions captivating, having won numerous awards. I enjoyed dissecting cases meticulously to draw conclusive judgements on work experience at Kendall & Davies Solicitors, confirming my decision to study law. Work experience at the House of Commons, where I witnessed the debate on the Iran Nuclear Deal, deepened my appreciation of the scrupulous approach required when considering law in principle and in practice. As President of MSJ Law Society, discussing when law should override religious objections to health care has particularly interested me. I enjoyed cataloguing archives at the Birmingham Hippodrome theatre over the summer. Being on my school lacrosse team and charity committee have both respectively developed my negotiation skills. I have hugely enjoyed the responsibilities of being a Head of House and Senior Prefect.

Law is what has defined our histories, law is what will define our futures.

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