University of Liverpool, Law and Politics Personal Statement

Law and Politics, University of Liverpool

To say that the world is “immoral” is perhaps an overtly harsh critique, but we do, as we always have, exist within a world of inequality and injustice. Whilst seemingly ever-present throughout human history, such pillars of societal dysfunction are not to be accepted, nor even tolerated; I believe that a more egalitarian redistribution of both material wealth and civil rights is a wholly achievable end toward which one can dedicate time, if not a lifetime.

The literature I have read, both in fiction and in political theory, has personally illuminated such truths and has subsequently moulded my beliefs; Charles Dickens’ ‘Bleak House’ is scathing in its rhetoric surrounding the oppressive and exploitative industrialisation of Victorian England, and the subsequent folly of aspiration that arose within the middle classes, whilst also criticising the failure of a bureaucratic legal system in desperate need of reform. By contrast, Harper Lee’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ extols the ability of a functioning legal defence to be the sole guardian of the oppressed in the face of systemic corruption and ingrained prejudice, and how, whilst ultimately unsuccessful, a virtuous man can utilise the law to illustrate the hysteria and injustice of a society. Evidently, art can illuminate the reality of dysfunction and injustice, however, crucially, I hold firm belief that the twin disciplines of Law and Politics are both the theoretical and practical tenets of enacting the desired and necessary change.

Legality is the impartial protector of the common man from his fellow man, his state and himself; a functioning legal system can ensure the ongoing coexistence and cooperation of all parties, free from oppressive force, both physical and nuanced. Legality and constitution can also provide defence against the tyranny of the establishment, whilst upholding the pillars of functioning society, and, in turn, political movement and theory can ensure the law remains useful and informed in its servitude of a population. Focusing upon the issue of change, one must understand both the law and the political state in order to critique those aspects that uphold undesirable injustice, and subsequently wield such knowledge to bring about “just” change.

I realise that mere exuberant interest and theory is not enough; I have exercised my enthusiasm wherever I have been able to over the past few years, both informing my specialist knowledge and developing the skills of organisation, leadership and meticulous study that will benefit my general capability. Having gained invaluable insight and experience working closely alongside former Member of Parliament David Drew for a year during an election campaign, whilst also frequenting proceedings at Cheltenham Magistrates Court, I have cultivated my interests in both the legal and the political; as a result, I wish to diligently pursue such study at a higher educational level.

To seek a greater purpose is to be fulfilled by even marginally improving the balance of socio-political justice that so affects the lives of the many and the vulnerable; I feel quite sure that undertaking study in the fields of Law and Politics, together or in specialisation, is the keystone to attaining this. Whatever one can achieve in a personal sense feels rather superficial when one considers the inconsequential amount of time gifted to each individual; the emphasis must be upon the collective, and change must be focused upon the systemic.

I approach higher education with a desire to strengthen and refine both my knowledge and my practical ability to influence the issues that I care so deeply about. Having a desire to indulge a personal interest in both political and legal matters, and having the means to do so, would provide me with a privilege that many do not have, and, as such, it feels only just that I should use my interest, and perhaps my aptitude, to aid the humane revolution, and play a small part in the defeat of the “immoral world”.

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