GCSE results day

GCSE exams may feel like a long time ago but results day has finally arrived after a long summer of waiting! On GCSE results day in August, there are a few steps you can do to prepare yourself for the anxious day.

Before you pick up your GCSE results

Ensure your mobile phone is charged, and if you can and want to, have someone to go with you, so you’re not alone. Having a healthy breakfast in the morning will fuel you for the hetic day! Also take money incase you decide to go somewhere after, and make sure there is credit on your phone so that you can call friends and family or colleges – remember to check out student discounts, as there is a lot of extra stuff you can get as a student and could save on phone contracts.

What will it feel like picking up my GCSE results?

Depending on the time of day, your school may either be busy with students or not, some students prefer to pick up their results early while others will pick them up later. Students and teachers will be around the campus, but most of them will be in or around the hall – most schools choose to have their result tables featured in a hall, but your school will inform you where to go prior to results day.

There will be a handful of tables with people sitting behind them, who have envelopes with names on. The envelopes will be grouped alphabetically, so queue up at the table that has the first letter of your surname on and wait.

You may feel nervous when opening your results and that is perfectly normal. Try to stay as calm as possible and remember whatever the outcome may be there is always a silver lining!

 

I achieved my GCSE grades that I wanted

Congratulations if you received the results that you were predicted or wanted to receive! Well done on working hard and getting through your exams, you can now phone your friends and family – if you want to – about the good news, or wait to tell them in person. One option is to then continue onto college, and if this is something you want to do you may have already applied to college prior to your results.

At college, you can study AS/A Levels, BTECs and National Diplomas. Students can decide to change sixth forms, or colleges or to stay at their sixth form, the choice is up to them. Go to the college or institution that offers the courses that you want to take.

If you want to go down a more vocational route, you could also take a college with more a practical aspect, such as a trade, or hairdressing, etc. Whatever course that you choose to study ensure that it is what you want to and that it is the direction you wish to walk towards.

I didn’t receive all of the GCSEs I was predicted

If you, unfortunately, do not receive all of the GCSE results you were predicted, or you needed a specific grade from certain subject, there are still options for you. Firstly, speak to a teacher or careers advisor that is in the exam hall and tell them your plans and how these GCSE results affect them. That teacher or careers advisor will offer advice on what you can do next; there are options to retake GCSEs and exams or to have your test remarked. If you decide you feel it would be best to retake a GCSE exam(s), it’s important to set up study goals and read up on GCSE study tips to be ready for your re-takes.                                   

Some GCSES are able to be re-sat the following January, or your college or sixth form may offer you the chance to resit your GCSEs during Year 12. However, bear in mind if you want your test to be remarked, this should happen when you are a few marks away from the grade above, as this is most likely to be a mistake from the examining board. When the examiner’s mark all the GCSE papers, these marks are then checked and those who check the marks, on occasion, may feel that the papers were undermarked or overmarked. If this is the case, they will reduce or increase the marks for all the papers which could affect your GCSE mark. Be aware that if you do request your paper to be remarked you may have to pay for it, and it may not produce the result that you want. Your test will then be remarked individually, and it may decrease in marks. If you do wish for your paper to be remarked, you should look into how long this takes, if there are any deadlines, and how long you will have to wait for the remark – in case you are moving onto college and need your remark results for a specific date.

Speak to your college or sixth form about what results you need to move onto the steps. If you need a certain grade to study specific courses, the institution may have options for you that either involve you still studying that course or a different path you can take where you can take that course at a later date, or offer a similar course that requires a lower or different GCSE grade.

 

I have failed most of my GCSEs

It may feel like a horrible situation, or that you failed terribly, but remember, if you worked hard during revision sessions and tried your hardest then don’t feel bad about your results. There are many reasons why you could have received these results, from feeling too stressed and overwhelmed or to not feeling prepared for the exam. There are still many career options available after taking GCSE’s and for those who didn’t receive their GCSEs. Also, remember that you worked through your GCSEs and did take the exams which is a huge celebration in themselves.

Some people are more practical and prefer to be hands-on, while others may consider training for a trade, perhaps an apprenticeship would be best suited. A lot of institutions will offer vocational courses and some subjects that combine working and learning.